Sep 30 2017

Aging & Alzheimer’s awareness – Week 3 of 4

The three general stages of Alzheimer’s – source

Alzheimer’s disease typically progresses slowly in three general stages — mild (early-stage), moderate (middle-stage), and severe (late-stage). Since Alzheimer’s affects people in different ways, each person will experience symptoms – or progress through Alzheimer’s stages – differently.

 

To donate and/or join our team for the Winston-Salem ‘Walk to End Alzheimer’s’ on Saturday October 14th, 2017, click WSWGAA – WalkToEndAlz Thank You!

 

Mild Alzheimer’s disease (early-stage)

Common difficulties include:

  • Problems coming up with the right word or name
  • Trouble remembering names when introduced to new people
  • Challenges performing tasks in social or work settings.
  • Forgetting material that one has just read
  • Losing or misplacing a valuable object
  • Increasing trouble with planning or organizing

 

Moderate Alzheimer’s disease (middle-stage)

At this point, symptoms will be noticeable to others and may include:

  • Forgetfulness of events or about one’s own personal history
  • Feeling moody or withdrawn, especially in socially or mentally challenging situations
  • Being unable to recall their own address or telephone number or the high school or college from which they graduated
  • Confusion about where they are or what day it is
  • The need for help choosing proper clothing for the season or the occasion
  • Trouble controlling bladder and bowels in some individuals
  • Changes in sleep patterns, such as sleeping during the day and becoming restless at night
  • An increased risk of wandering and becoming lost
  • Personality and behavioral changes, including suspiciousness and delusions or compulsive, repetitive behavior like hand-wringing or tissue shredding

 

Severe Alzheimer’s disease (late-stage)

At this stage, individuals may:

  • Need round-the-clock assistance with daily activities and personal care
  • Lose awareness of recent experiences as well as of their surroundings
  • Experience changes in physical abilities, including the ability to walk, sit and, eventually, swallow
  • Have increasing difficulty communicating
  • Become vulnerable to infections, especially pneumonia

 

What to do if you notice these signs?

Schedule an appointment with your doctor.

 

You are not alone – Help and support is available 

Care and support services are available, making it easier for you and your family to live the best life possible with Alzheimer’s or dementia.

24/7 Helpline: 800.272.3900

 

 

~Winston-Salem Wolfhounds GAA Health Information (#WSWGAAHEALTHINFO)

http://www.alz.org/

 

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